Pigeon Tales: The Forbidden Tower

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A family of bears take a week out from family life for an adventure. This is their story. See book.

Fairy Tales by the Countess d'Aulnoy/The Pigeon and the Dove

Can dreams really come trueWhen a little Elf dreamed of becoming on of Santa's Christmas Elves he did not really believe dreams can come [ Author area. My account Bookstore How to publish in Bubok? Edit a book. Go to Bubok. Contact details Madrid 91 44 Portugal Colombia 1 Mexico 55 Argentina 54 Administration administracion bubok. Publishing services servicios bubok. Budgets asesoria bubok. Press prensa bubok. Suddenly he trod upon her, and pulled her; and what was her astonishment on waking, to perceive, about twenty paces from her, a young man behind some bushes, where he had hidden himself to see without being seen.

The beauty of his form and face, the nobleness of his manner, and the magnificence of his dress so surprised the Princess, that she rose hastily, with the intention of hurrying away.

I know not what secret spell arrested her flight. She cast a timid glance on the stranger; the Giant had scarcely caused her so much alarm; but fear arises from various causes. The looks and actions of this youthful pair sufficiently indicated the sentiments with which they had already inspired each other.

They would have remained, perhaps, a long time without speaking, except with their eyes, if the Prince had not heard the sound of horns, and the cry of the hounds approaching. He saw that the Princess was astonished at it. I am a poor orphan, who has no other course left her but to become a shepherdess. Obtain for me the charge of a flock; I will tend it most carefully. I was born in a village; I have never known any other than a rustic life, and I hope you will allow me quietly to keep the Queen's sheep, if she will deign to confide them to my care.

I would even beseech her to place me under some more experienced shepherdess, and then, as I should be always with her, it is quite certain I should never feel dull. The Prince was prevented from replying; his attendants appeared on the brow of a little hill. Go to the end of this meadow; you will find a house there, in which you may dwell in safety, if you say you come from me.


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He followed her with his eyes; he sighed tenderly, and, mounting his horse, placed himself at the head of his company, and discontinuing the chace , returned to the palace. He found the Queen exceedingly irritated against an old shepherdess, who had given her a very bad account of her lambs. After the Queen had well scolded her, she ordered her never to appear in her presence again.

This was a favourable opportunity for Constancio; he told his mother he had met a young girl who was very desirous of entering her service, that she looked like a careful person, and did not seem mercenary. The Queen was much pleased with her son's account of this shepherdess; she accepted her offer without seeing her, and desired the Prince to give orders for her to be sent, with the rest, to the pastures belonging to the crown. He was enchanted that the Queen dispensed with the appearance of the shepherdess at the palace.

In point of fact, he was less afraid of the nobles than of the humbler persons about the court, and imagined her more likely to take a fancy to a simple shepherd than to a prince who was so near to the throne. It would be difficult to recount all the reflections to which this gave rise. How he reproached his heart—that heart which till now had never loved, which had never thought any one worthy of him, had now bestowed itself on a girl of such obscure origin, that he could never own his passion without a blush.

He determined to struggle with it; and, persuading himself that absence was an unfailing remedy, particularly in the case of a dawning affection, he avoided the sight of the shepherdess. He followed his favourite amusement of hunting, and other sports. Wherever he caught sight of sheep, he turned from them as though they had been serpents; so that, after some little time, the wound he had received appeared less painful to him. But on one of the hottest of the dog-days, Constancio, fatigued by a long run with the hounds, finding himself on the banks of the river, followed its course under the shade of the lote-trees, [2] that mixed their branches with the willows, and rendered this spot as cool as it was lovely.

He fell into a profound reverie; he was alone, and he thought no longer of all those who were waiting for him; when suddenly he was struck by the charming tones of a voice, which seemed to him celestial. He stopped to listen, and was not a little surprised to hear these words:—. I had vowed I would live without Love, But perjured the God has resolved I should prove, I feel in my bosom his torturing dart, Constancio, master he makes of my heart!

His curiosity prevailed over the pleasure he experienced in listening to so sweet a voice; he advanced quickly. He had scarcely mounted a little eminence, covered with trees, when he perceived, at the foot of it, the lovely Constancia; she was seated by the side of a streamlet, the rapid fall of which caused so agreeable a sound, that it appeared as if intended to harmonise with her voice. Her faithful ram crouched on the grass, kept, like the favourite of the flock, much closer to her than any of the others.

Constancia gave him occasionally little taps with her crook, caressing him with childish affection; and every time she touched him, he kissed her hand, and looked up in her face with eyes beaming with intelligence. Ought I to love her? I have studiously avoided her, because I knew full well the danger of seeing her. Ye gods! Reason essayed to help me, and I fled so enchanting an object. I meet with her but to hear her sing of the happy youth she has chosen! Whilst he thus meditated, the shepherdess rose to collect her flock, and drive them into another meadow, where she had left her companions.

The Prince feared to lose this opportunity of speaking to her; he advanced towards her eagerly.

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Jealousy will sometimes rekindle the torch of Love. The Prince's passion at this moment burst into such a flame, that nothing could ever extinguish it. He discovered a thousand graces in that young maiden which he had not remarked the first time he saw her. The manner in which she had left him, convinced him as much as her words that she was partial to some shepherd; a deep melancholy took possession of his soul. He dared not follow her, great as was his anxiety to renew the conversation. He flung himself upon the spot she had just quitted, and after recalling to his memory the verses he had heard her sing, he wrote them down in his tablets, and examined them carefully.

Must I bear the same name, and be so far from his good fortune? How coldly she looked on me! Her chief care was to find some pretext for leaving me.


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As soon as he returned to the palace, he sent for a youth who was his companion in all his pleasures; he was of high birth, and very amiable. Mirtain so was the young gentleman named was too anxious to please his master to neglect an opportunity of so doing in a matter which appeared so much to interest him. He promised to obey his commands to the best of his ability; and the very next morning he was ready to proceed to the pastures. The keeper of them would not have admitted him, had he not produced an order from the Prince, in which it was stated that he was the Prince's shepherd, and had charge of his flock.

He was immediately permitted to mix with the rural company. He was very gallant, and easily succeeded in making himself agreeable to the shepherdesses generally; but with regard to Constancia, he found she possessed a spirit so far above what she appeared to be, that he could not reconcile the existence of so much beauty, wit, and merit with the rude and country life she led.

It was in vain be followed her; he always found her alone in the depths of the forest, singing abstractedly. He observed no shepherd venture to attempt to please her; it seemed to be too difficult a task. Mirtain made that great attempt himself; he courted her assiduously, and learned from his own experience that she declined forming any engagement.

Every evening he reported to the Prince the state of affairs; all the information he gave him had only the effect of distracting him. She may have quarrelled with her lover. Speak well or ill of me, thou mayest in some measure arrive at what she thinks of me.

Mirtain failed not to find an opportunity to speak to Constancia. I have studied him; I can see what is passing in his mind, and I know that he is far from happy. But what am I saying? Those of which you speak are too delicate for me to think of entering upon. Adieu, Mirtain," she added, quitting him hastily: "if you would oblige me, you will speak no more to me about your Prince, or his amours.

She hurried away, greatly agitated. She could not have been insensible to the merits of the Prince; her first meeting with him had never been effaced from her mind, and but for the secret spell which detained her despite herself, it is certain she would have risked everything to find once more the Sovereign Fairy.

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We might, indeed, feel surprised that that skilful person, who knew everything, did not fly to her assistance; but it no longer depended upon her to do so. Constancia's eyes were not able to look at it steadily enough to discover her protectress in it. The charming girl had observed, with some mortification, that the Prince had neglected her so completely, that he might never have seen her again, had not chance led him to the spot where she was singing.

She endeavoured to stifle her inclination for him; and if it be possible to love and hate a person at the same time, I may say she hated him because she loved him too well! How many tears did she shed in secret! Ruson was the only witness of them; to him she frequently confided her sorrows, as if he were capable of understanding her; and when he frisked about the fields with the ewes, she would say to him, "Beware, Ruson!

Let not love inflame thy heart; of all evils, 'tis the greatest: and shouldst thou love, and not be loved in return, poor little ram, what wouldst thou do!

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These reflections were followed by a thousand reproaches, which she heaped upon herself for cherishing an affection for a Prince who manifested so much indifference for her. She had determined to forget him, when she accidentally found him in that pleasant spot, to which he had retired to muse uninterruptedly on the lovely shepherdess he avoided. Sleep had stolen upon him, and he had stretched himself on the grass. She saw him, and her affection for him received fresh force.